Stormy 611Stormy 611The NW 611 sits during the firing-up process at the N.C. Transportation Museum on August 6, 2016.
The Behind-the-Scenes events give you a chance to learn more about the engine, meet the crew, and get up close and personal without as many other people around.

 

Rusted Rail Ramblings with Gene Bowker

 

Football Saturday and Old Favorites

September 10, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

In Georgia, Saturday in the Fall means football especially when the Dawgs are playing at home in Athens.  

I watched the first half against Nichols State, but their unimpressive play had me ready to get back to watching one of my all-time favorite Railroad DVDs the Ultimate Cajon by Pentrex.

 With 12 hours of footage from one of my favorite train-watching locations of childhood (I grew up in Poway down I-15 in San Diego County) its a great reminder of "home".

I'll be posting a full review of this DVD to officially kick off the reviews, but until then have a great weekend!

Georgia Railroad 1026Georgia Railroad 1026The Georgia Railroad 1026 works the caboose train at the Southeastern Railway Museum in Duluth, Georgia on May 30th, 2015.

 


A visit with an old friend

August 14, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Norfolk & Western 611


Working for a living

June 11, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Conagra 101 GainesvilleConagra 101 GainesvilleThe remote control switcher works at Conagra in Gainesville, GA in June 2016

 

The remote control switcher works at Conagra in Gainesville, GA in June 2016.

The sound of the old switcher is in stark contrast to the high-powered road power on the Norfolk Southern behind me.

 


Norfolk & Western 521

February 13, 2016  •  1 Comment

NW 521 DesaturatedNW 521 DesaturatedBehind the photo - The Norfolk & Western 521

I had visited the Virginia Museum of Transportation before, but somehow I had overlooked this locomotive until my most recent visit due to some of the more famous attractions there.

The 521 story.

The GP9 was acquired in 1958 to replace the famous J-Class steam engines . The 521 was the last of the class of 21 purchased from EMD. These locomotives were equipped with steam generators and featured a maroon paint scheme which complimented the Norfolk & Western's passenger fleet.

The 521 now resides at the Virginia Museum of Transportation along with the J-Class 611 which it replaced on the railroad 50 plus years ago.

The museum's website talks about the steam to diesel transition:

The railway lines found that a reduction in the size of the crew was a particularly attractive benefit of diesel versus steam. There was no fire, of course, eliminating the need for a fireman. Fueling stops were much less frequent and crews could travel further. However, they did not realize the benefits right away. The powerful railroad unions fought the elimination of the fireman. They also fought the extension of the 100 mile track regions to the 200 or 300 miles that the railways wanted. It took years to win the changes. Today, the diesels typically have two people in each cab, primarily for safety reasons.(A)

Both of these locomotives are great examples of the N&W in the late 1950s which many consider the "Golden Age of Railroading" in America.

More about the 521:http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-EMD-GP-9-521.html

Sources:
(A)
http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-start.html

Behind the photo - The Norfolk & Western 521

I had visited the Virginia Museum of Transportation before, but somehow I had overlooked this locomotive until my most recent visit due to some of the more famous attractions there.

The 521 story.

The GP9 was acquired in 1958 to replace the famous J-Class steam engines . The 521 was the last of the class of 21 purchased from EMD. These locomotives were equipped with steam generators and featured a maroon paint scheme which complimented the Norfolk & Western's passenger fleet.

The 521 now resides at the Virginia Museum of Transportation along with the J-Class 611 which it replaced on the railroad 50 plus years ago.

The museum's website talks about the steam to diesel transition:

The railway lines found that a reduction in the size of the crew was a particularly attractive benefit of diesel versus steam. There was no fire, of course, eliminating the need for a fireman. Fueling stops were much less frequent and crews could travel further. However, they did not realize the benefits right away. The powerful railroad unions fought the elimination of the fireman. They also fought the extension of the 100 mile track regions to the 200 or 300 miles that the railways wanted. It took years to win the changes. Today, the diesels typically have two people in each cab, primarily for safety reasons.(A)

Both of these locomotives are great examples of the N&W in the late 1950s which many consider the "Golden Age of Railroading" in America.

More about the 521: http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-EMD-GP-9-521.html

Sources:
(A)
http://vmt.org/Loops-Collections/Diesel-Locomotive-Loop/Diesel-Locomotive-start.html


Happy Veterans Day

November 11, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

USMC F4 YorktownUSMC F4 Yorktown

This would have been state of the art when my father served during Vietnam in the Navy.  He flew on E-2s as a radar tech and later served in the Naval Reserve until he passed away in 1986.  

Thanks to all who served and are currently serving today.

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